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ONLINE NEWSLETTER
 
Fact or Fiction?

Bald eagles are an endangered species, right?


Actually, and happily, this is no longer true. Across North America, including, of course, here on Catalina, the recovery of America’s amazing and most iconographic bird is a remarkable success story. The bald eagle is no longer considered endangered.
.
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service classified the bald eagle in 1978 as an endangered species in 43 states and a threatened species in five others. The species was not listed in Alaska and it does not occur in Hawaii. In 1995, the species was down-listed to threatened in all recovery regions of the lower 48 states. In 1999, U.S. Fish and Wildlife proposed to remove the bald eagle from the federal threatened and endangered species list nationwide. The bald eagle was delisted from the Endangered Species Act in 2007.

Currently, the bald eagle retains protection under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act, Lacey Act, Airborne Hunting Act, and others (source: http://www.swbemc.org/bio.html)

So, while no longer endangered, bald eagles are absolutely protected, and there are strict penalties for harassing eagles or humans having any eagle body part in their possession (including feathers).





Did You Know…Female bald eagles are bigger than males.



THE ISLAND NATURALIST
Issue #11 / Eagle News You Can Use


IN THIS ISSUE...


Catalina’s Bald Eagles Are Back
New Eggs, New Chicks!
Fact or Fiction: Still Endangered?
Did You Know … Females Outsize Males




Photo by Frank Hein

My, my … what big talons you have. The term “raptor” means to seize or to grasp, which is something that bald eagles are certainly specialized to do. Note the silver United States Fish and Wildlife Service band on the bird’s leg.

 

 

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