PRESS LIBRARY
Conservancy Communications
In the News
Press Inquiries
Press Releases
PUBLICATIONS
Conservancy Times
ENewsletter
FAQs
FILMING & PHOTOGRAPHY
NEWSLETTER SIGNUP
 
Monthly News from
the Conservancy!


Enter Your Email Address:



 
License Error. [Help]

December 2020
S M T W T F S
29 30 1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 31 1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9

ONLINE NEWSLETTER
 
DID YOU KNOW…Eaglets can’t regulate their body temperatures.
By Frank Hein

So how do bald eagles manage the thermoregulation of their young? Adult females develop what are called brood patches. They lose feathers at the area where their bodies contact the eggs and young. By placing the eggs or nestlings directly against their skin, the mothers are able to transfer more heat to the young and keep them warm. That’s one of the reasons that females do far more incubating and caring for the young than the males in the first two weeks after the eggs hatch. After that two-week period, a shift will occur in which males play a greater role in caring for the chicks.

Did you miss the last issue of Island Naturalist? Click here.



THE ISLAND NATURALIST
Issue #22 / All About Bald Eagles


IN THIS ISSUE...


In an Eggshell 
What to Expect
Fact or Fiction? Knowing Resident Baldies
Did You Know … Eaglets Need Moms’ Warmth    



Screen shot from an Institute for Wildlife Studies webcam (March 7,  2013)

Female bald eagles will do most of the incubating since they are the ones with brood patches, allowing either eggs or chicks direct contact with the mother’s skin to collect her body heat.


Missed recent issues?
Issue #1 / All About Bison

Issue #2 / All About Birds

Issue #3 / All About Plants
Issue #4 / All About Eagles
Issue #5 / All About Ravens & Crows
Issue #6 / All About Natives & Invasives  
Issue #7 / All About Rain
Issue #8 / All About Bison Roundup
Issue #9 / All About Foxes
Issue #10 / All About Weeds
Issue #11 / All About Eagle Hatchlings
Issue #12 / All About Snakes
Issue #13 / All About Diurnal Raptors
Issue #14 / All About Diurnal Raptors II
Issue #15 / All About Giants & Dwarves
Issue #16 / All About Fire Ecology
Issue #17 / All About Mule Deer
Issue #18 / All About Feral Cats
Issue #19 / All About Acorn Woodpeckers
Issue #20 / All About Tachi
Issue #21 / All About Observing Nature

 

 

708 Crescent Ave., Avalon 90704 | Phone: (310) 510-2595 | 320 Golden Shore, Suite 220, Long Beach, CA 90802 | Phone: (562) 437-8555
Copyright © 2020 Catalina Island Conservancy. All rights reserved.